Slipping My Mind

Victorianist. Dad. Reader. Gamer. Tennis Fan. Erstwhile Protagonist.

final-vent-card asked: Mrs. Simone, I've heard people say that part of the reason why women in the comic book industry have such a hard time is because "they haven't banded together" or "they haven't let themselves be heard" on the same level as, say, bronies have for all of their little documentaries--in spite of things like your famous "women in refrigerators" ditty. I don't buy into that, but given your experience on the matter, how do you feel about it?

gailsimone:

I feel this: pbbbllllbbbbbt. 

"Banded together," what nonsense. No one says male writers have to ‘band together,’ to get their work looked at. 

When women HAD a fairly large organization (Friends Of Lulu) as a voice and support group, we had a far lower female readership than we have now. 

I am not against women banding together, we SHOULD band together. But this is another case of blaming a group that has been systematically pushed away for their own ostracization. Instead of blaming the people who were made unwelcome, why not look at the behavior of the self-appointed gatekeepers who persist to this day at every level of the industry from fan to CEO?

As for ‘letting ourselves be heard,” I have no idea what internet these people are connected to, but it doesn’t seem to be one I am familiar with. There are thousands of women blogging and writing about comics every day all over the world. There are blogs and social platforms being used by female creators of every stripe. Many, a huge number, of the best commentators, reviewers and site owners of comics-related sites are female. And despite the shit they get for it, many have kept at it doggedly for years. 

I “let myself be heard” all over the place and I get hate mail every day for it. We let ourselves be heard, and unlike most of the majority readership, we are virtually guaranteed an endless supply of contempt and trolling and insults for it. 

And we do it, anyway.

Also, I would say Women In Refigerators wasn’t really a ‘ditty,’ so much as an ‘opening salvo.’

But that’s just me.  

Anyway, it’s all moot, because we are winning this debate as our numbers grow in huge percentages. And it makes better comics, so ultimately, everyone wins regardless of gender. 

momochanners:

AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA

Chills, I haz them.

(via crazed-abomination)

gaming in color - now available!

Gaming in Color is finished, and available as of today. It’s pay-what-you-can, so no excuse: go to the site and download it..!

(Source: girlslikegiants)

Hard to find superheroine stuff for kids. Got this Little Golden Book for my daughter for Easter, and it’s pretty great. But WW and Batgirl are a little cruel? Poor Ivy turns into a tree, and all they can think to do is to spout some plant-pun related burns and fly away laughing.

blackballoonpublishing:

“Whaaaat?” you say. “Isn’t Emma by Jane Austen?” Yes, yes. The more commonly known Emma is indeed by Austen, but it’s also the title of Bronte’slast novel, which she started in the very last month before her death. She passed away before she could finish it, but left us with the startings of a captivating story about a terribly oppressive boarding school. Using both Bronte’s notes and the power of imagination writer, Constance Savery completed the manuscript.
KEEP READING: ”Celebrate Charlotte Bronte’s Birthday with 10 Books That aren’t Jane Eyre”

blackballoonpublishing:

“Whaaaat?” you say. “Isn’t Emma by Jane Austen?” Yes, yes. The more commonly known Emma is indeed by Austen, but it’s also the title of Bronte’slast novel, which she started in the very last month before her death. She passed away before she could finish it, but left us with the startings of a captivating story about a terribly oppressive boarding school. Using both Bronte’s notes and the power of imagination writer, Constance Savery completed the manuscript.

KEEP READING: Celebrate Charlotte Bronte’s Birthday with 10 Books That aren’t Jane Eyre

enrychan:

I wanted to try some new brushes I downloaded today, so I drew a thing

enrychan:

I wanted to try some new brushes I downloaded today, so I drew a thing

(via gat0gateaux)